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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  January 21, 2017 8:00am-9:01am GMT

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hello. this is breakfast, with charlie stayt and steph mcgovern. the first full day in office for the new president of the united sates, as donald trump pledges to fulfill his campaign promises he's already signed his first orders as president, including changes to barack obama's healthcare act, which mr trump said he will repeal. we wa nt we want to make america great again, and we will. inauguration day ended with a series of balls, before the president and first lady returned to the white house to spend the first night in their new home. good morning. it's saturday the 21st of january. we'll look back on president trump's inauguration, and what's in store for his first few days in power. also ahead: four more survivors have been pulled out of the debris of an italian hotel, almost 72 hours after it was
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swamped by an avalanche. leaders of europe's right wing parties gather in germany to discuss their opposition to the european union. thousands of protestors are expected to demonstrate. in sport, konta keeps the brits on top down under. johanna konta makes it eight wins in a row as she breezes into the 4th round of the australian open by knocking out a former world number one in straight sets. and in from the cold: i've been training with the british long—track speed skating team, whose sport has been revived in the netherlands. and nick has the weather. the weekend is getting off to a frosty start. patchy fog around too. most frosty start. patchy fog around too. m ost pla ces frosty start. patchy fog around too. most places will see the sunshine today, with a dry day ahead. all your weather in half an hour. good morning. first, our main story: president donald trump, has wasted no time in getting to work.
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shortly after his inauguration parade ended, the new man in charge signed an executive order to begin dismantling ba rack obama's affordable care act, known as obamaca re. in his first speech as leader, mr trump promised to take power from the establishment in washington and give it back to the people. last night the president and first lady attended a number of traditional balls held to thank his supporters. our washington reporter, laura bicker, has more. grip and now, the president and first lady of the united states will ta ke first lady of the united states will take their first dance. and never has a song be more appropriate for a president. donald trump got here by doing things very differently, a trait he shows no sign of losing as commander—in—chief. # i commander—in—chief. #idid it my commander—in—chief. # i did it my way... #. should i keep the twitter going or
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not? keep it going? i think so. should i keep the twitter going or not? keep it going? ithink so. he beamed as he arrived at galas across washington, clasping the hand of his wife and first lady. in your balls are part of the choreography of this historic day. well, we did it. we began this journey, and they said we, we, and me, we didn't have a chance, but we knew we were going to win. and we won. as he shuffled around the floor, word spread that he had already made his first executive move, an action that will help repeal or balmercare, his predecessor's signature health care law. —— obamacare. meanwhile,
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protests broke out from coast—to—coast. people were arrested after a small handful of anti—trump rallies turned violent. in chicago, hundreds peacefully voiced their concerns at donald trump's agenda, and in seattle, they marched through the streets. further demonstrations are planned over the weekend. but the new president will shrug off this criticism, just as he did during the campaign. surrounded by family and friends, he is taking a moment to enjoy this particular piece of pagea ntry moment to enjoy this particular piece of pageantry before the real work begins. and we can speak to laura now. good morning to you. in terms of the donald trump message in his inauguration speech and later in the
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evening at those balls, it was uncompromising, wasn't it? this is donald trump being donald trump. he was uncompromising as a candidate, controversial as some may have found, and he will be uncompromising asa found, and he will be uncompromising as a president. that was his message, both as he addressed the crowd that the maul, and that the ball last night. —— at the mall. although perhaps many have urged him to be more presidential, donald trump has said, this is me and this is who i will be in the next four yea rs, is who i will be in the next four years, and that included hitting the white house reset button. never has there been such a contrast between an incoming and an outgoing president, and his policies will va ry president, and his policies will vary wildly from barack obama's. laura, thank you. reacting to president trump's inaugural speech to put america ‘first‘, the foreign secretary borisjohnson told the bbc he remains positive
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about the prospect of a new trade deal with the us. the new president has made it very clear that he wants to put britain at the front of the line for a new trade deal most obvious, that's extremely exciting and important. and he is very keen to get it done as fast as possible, and optimistic that it can be done soon. he said within a short period after the exit from the eu, and that's great, but it's got to work in the uk as well. every reason to be positive and optimistic. protest marches to demand women's rights will take place in more than 30 countries to mark donald trump's first day in office. this one in sydney, australia, is already underway and hundreds more are due to take place around the world, including in many uk cities. around 200,000 people are also expected to attend a march in the american capital. italian firefighters say four more survivors have been pulled out of the debris of the hotel swamped by an avalanche on wednesday. four children were among those pulled from the remains yesterday. attempts are continuing
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to rescue more sui’vivoi’s, but it's thought at least 15 people remain unaccounted for. andy moore reports. as darkness fell on the third night since the avalanche, a six—year—old girl was pulled from the rubble, cold but apparently well. soon after came another child, a boy, one of four children who have so far been rescued from the rubble of the hotel. they are said to have survived in a kitchen, protected by concrete walls that also silenced their cries for help. after these images were filmed, another four adults — two women and two men — were also rescued. the survivors found yesterday were flown to hospital in pescara. they were said to be cold and dehydrated, but otherwise in remarkably good condition. for some relatives who had endured a long wait for news, there was huge relief. translation: can't you see it from my face?
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doesn't my face show how happy i am? it's great, i can't describe it in words. i'd like to see him. for now, the boy is safe, and i hope his parents have managed to survive as well. but for other relatives, the anxious wait goes on. four bodies have been recovered so far. if at least 15 people are missing. night and day until everyone is accounted for. andy moore, bbc news. a hungarian coach has crashed in northern italy killing at least 16 people. the coach was on its way back from a mountain resort in france when it hit a pylon at a motorway exit near the city of verona and caught fire. according to reports, the coach was carrying a large number of schoolchildren. no other vehicles were involved in the incident. the leaders of some of europe's right—wing populist parties will gather in the german city
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of koblenz today to discuss their shared opposition to the european union. the leader of the french national front, marine le pen, will be one those attending. 0ur berlin correspondentjenny hill is in koblenz for us this morning. jenny, what are they trying to achieve at this meeting? good morning. ithink good morning. i think today is all about trying to achieve a public display of unity in what is the beginning ofan display of unity in what is the beginning of an election year for so many other leaders these parties. marine le pen is expected to be here. she is enjoying significant support in her bid to become the next french president. geert wilders's freedom party is polling well ahead of elections in holland. they share anti—immigrant rhetoric
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with a german far right party. a public show of strength together. they have all been emboldened by donald trump's victory in the states, but they are causing a lot of concern, not just states, but they are causing a lot of concern, notjust among the political establishment here. there will be thousands of protesters here today. they have banned the german mainstream media from attending, which is causing concern. make no mistake — the leaders here are going out to target parts of the electorate who have been unnerved by the migrant crisis and who feel let down by the political establishment. he is accused of drug trafficking,
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kidnapping and conspiracy to murder. let's get back to our top story, and it's the first full day in office for president trump. 0ur correspondent laura bicker is in in washington. we assembled here today are issuing a new decree to be heard in every city, every foreign capital, and in every hole of power. from this day forward , every hole of power. from this day forward, a new vision will govern oui’ forward, a new vision will govern ourland. forward, a new vision will govern our land. from this day forward, it's going to be only america first. america first. stephen hurst is a reader in politics and us foreign policy from manchester metropolitan university. he joins us on the sofa now. america was the keyword that was
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said so often — what does this mean now for following policy, said so often — what does this mean now forfollowing policy, do said so often — what does this mean now for following policy, do you think? -- now for following policy, do you think? —— foreign policy? now for following policy, do you think? -- foreign policy? it's not a unique, brand—new message, this notion of america first. the phrases from the 1920s, charles lindbergh usedit from the 1920s, charles lindbergh used it on the american right, this tradition of seeing cooperation and multilateralism as something that restra i ns multilateralism as something that restrains the united states. it is not new. but it is something which has not dominated american foreign policy since the end of the second world war. most american presidents since then have accepted that america needs to work with other nations. george bush is part of the exception here. this is, to some extent, i'm trodden ground, and the
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implications are uncertain and it is not clear how it will go. it is reason for concern, i think, for lots of america's allies. lots of people are saying that this was not a conciliatory speech, not one drawing people together. he was very much preaching to the converted, but with the overview saying, if you are being patriotic, everything is ok. yes, i mean, it was... surprising and unsurprising. unsurprising in the sense that it was entirely of a piece with everything he said in the campaign, surprising in the sense that at an inaugural address it is a time when you try to heal the wounds of the campaign, and he did the opposite. he said the same things he had said throughout the campaign, and actually, making those divisions
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deeper rather than trying to heal them, which was a strange thing to do. he dammed everybody in washington for what they have done so far, people he will have to work with. the republican party people we re with. the republican party people were in there as those people who have done nothing for everybody after the last —— over the past however many years. he has abused the establishment from the most prominent position he could. and the m essa 9 es prominent position he could. and the messages are all about giving it back to the people, which is what he said throughout his campaign. what do you think are the areas of concern? you talked about foreign policy. from our point of view, if you are a european, the nato issue is the thing. i don't think the united states will leave nato. it is very unlikely. the question is whether nato has become in some
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sense a dead letter, if trump is not committed to it and doesn't see the europeans as playing their part. what message does that send to vladimir putin and eastern europe? ifi vladimir putin and eastern europe? if i lived in a baltic state right now, i would if i lived in a baltic state right now, iwould be if i lived in a baltic state right now, i would be very worried. vladimir putin has an agenda clearly of weakening the european union. nato is a key part of the tearing him from adventurism. that is a big problem, not in the sense that it necessarily means war or anything that dramatic, but if it encourages putin to do things that are reckless because he thinks he can get away with them, that is a dangerous situation to be in. thank you very much for your time this morning. steven hirst is from manchester metropolitan university. you're watching breakfast from bbc news. let's get a look at the weather. frosty rooftops in lancaster this
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morning. if you like your saturday crisp cold and sunny, this is the day for you. we are as low as minus eight celsius in hampshire. a hard frost for some. there are some fog patches around this morning. if you are travelling first thing, bear that in mind, it might slow you down a bit. it's a few hours before some of that will clear. cornwall and devon are not quite as cold as other areas this morning. norfolk is also areas this morning. norfolk is also a few degrees above freezing. a sunny day for northern ireland and scotland. more of us getting the
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blue sky compared with recent days. a crisp start. well above freezing in the northern and western isles. a bit more clout pushing into more of south—west england this afternoon, into northern ireland, and this area of cloud from the north sea will expand across northern england and the midlands, and into norfolk as well. you may see some drizzle from that, especially close to the coast. temperatures are 3—6dc. tonight, not as much frost. there is more cloud around. some light rain in northern england, moving into scotland. a riske patchy fog into tomorrow morning. sunday, more clout compared with the day. the best of the sunshine likely to be through the midlands, southern england, east anglia and into the south—east.
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cloudy in parts of south—west england and wales, delivering a few showers. patchy rain in northern england and scotland. cold enough to see a few wintry flurries on hills. temperatures will be in single figures, as they will be into the start of next week. it is a crisp and sunny one this weekend. is it and sunny one this weekend. isita and sunny one this weekend. is it a good time to be out with a metal detector? well, you won't get rained on. one of the world's largest hoards of celtic treasure has been removed from a site injersey, bringing to an end a 30—year obsession for two metal detectorists. the 70,000 thousand coins are worth millions of pounds, as our correspondent robert hall has been finding out. a good story needs the right
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ingredients. this one has a legend of buried treasure and two lifelong friends who never gave up the search. i can still remember the first time we went to the field. i was probably in my early 20s, i suppose, late teens, early 20s. we expected to find these coins insta ntly, expected to find these coins instantly, but of course, it didn't happen like that. it's a strange feeling, because there was something there that drew us to it. every time we drove by, we would stop and say, the field is empty, and we would go and give it another try. the treasure they were searching for had come tojersey treasure they were searching for had come to jersey with celtic tribesmen well over 2000 years ago. their quoins kept turning up, convincing reg and richard there was an even larger horde to be found here. reg and richard there was an even larger horde to be found herem 2012, someone was up in the top of the field and shouted, got one, or
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words to that effect, and that's where the story really took off. dredge got down there with the shovel and scooped out some more. on the end of it was five quoins, so i shouted out, reg! reg, richard and excited archaeologists had no idea what the 30 year search had actually uncovered. everyone thought it would bea uncovered. everyone thought it would be a pot of quoins, so i had a sheet of plywood to put it on and a bandaged up a brand it, and we thought we would be out in the first day. no one had ever actually got something like this out of the ground safely in one piece before. in this story, there were secrets within secrets. the horde's 70,000 coins enfolded even more precious treasures. we have a lot of these
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gold items which would have been worn by very important people in these celtic tribes. they are made into halves, so they would click apartand go into halves, so they would click apart and go back together. week after week, month after month, more treasures have emerged. after three yea rs of treasures have emerged. after three years of work, the final coin has now been removed. dismantling the horde has left many mysteries unsolved. how did it come to be here? was it buried as a tribute to gods or hidden from enemies? and does the large number of objects in a small area indicate a hidden settlement? this story isn't over yet. never so much study to do with the horde itself and what we can learn about events and times 2000 yea rs learn about events and times 2000 years ago, but in a broader context, what else is beneath the ground? it's as if horde found us. we didn't find the horde. maybe there is a reason for it in the future. that is dedication. 30 years and
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then you get a find like that. you're watching breakfast from bbc news. time now for a look at the newspapers. professor cary cooper from the university of manchester is here to tell us what's caught his eye. good morning. good morning. first, let's look at the front pages. the guardian leads on trump. the times also leads on trump, the 45th president of the united states. the independent has slightly more casual shots just after the
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inauguration itself. the daily mail have taken that image, hand on the bible in one hand in the air, taking the pledge. saying, i swear to be the people's president. the daily express as this image of trump, reflecting the idea of bringing power back to the people. carey, where shall we start? america first is a controversial expression. charles lindbergh use that expression to try to prevent the united states entering the second world war. it has anti—semitic overtones for quite a lot of the jewish anti—semitic overtones for quite a lot of thejewish community, so it is an interesting thing to say. he did mention god a lot. the first thing i am starting on isjust what i thought about the whole event, really. i am using here the daily
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mail, where it talks about how everybody thinks he is going to be conciliatory. the country is going to come together — what did he do? he did a donald trump. i don't think people understand this man. he is a conviction person, i was going to say politician. he behaved the way he did during the campaign. more important than that, i thought, he actually got at the elite. he said, you guys talk a good game. i'm surprised the cameras didn't go on to 0bama, because that is who he was talking about. you have all the former presidents, barack 0bama just a few feet away, and it was fascinating. there was one moment where the camera went to barack 0bama during the speech, and he was giving nothing away. although
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michelle 0bama did. during the whole ceremony, i thought, michelle 0bama did. during the whole ceremony, ithought, she michelle 0bama did. during the whole ceremony, i thought, she gave it away. barack ceremony, i thought, she gave it away. ba rack 0bama ceremony, i thought, she gave it away. barack 0bama and hillary clinton did not react to him very positively, as you might expect. people will be thinking, none of that matters now. that bit is over. absolutely. in a way, i like what he did because he was true to who he is. he didn't say, yeah, we will all come together under my leadership. hejust went come together under my leadership. he just went and higher ranked all the people, all the institutions and all the things he was going to do. of course, within two hours, he is starting to enact executive orders. the president doesn't have that much power, i don't think people understand. he can do executive orders, like building the wall, but he can't do it unless he gets money to do it. i 0bamacare he can get
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that. he does have more power than a few of the previous presidents, because he has congress and the senate behind him. remember, they will go with his domestic policy. things like 0bamacare. will go with his domestic policy. things like obamacare. illustrated on this chart. it is really great, because it picks out the words that 0bama used during his inauguration and the words that trump use. 33 times he uses america and americans. 0bama only mentioned it eight times in his speech. what i found interesting about this was that 0bama used the word piece and the word world. he used —— trump used the word dreams, wealth, bringing
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people together, the words together he used a lot. he used the word heart a lot. he also used the word carnage, which you wouldn't expect. yes. you have been in california in recent weeks. a lot of people are interested now in how this plays out in terms of those who are for and that those who are against. how has that those who are against. how has that played out in your family? we had a family do, and i come from a working—class background, so i am the first person in my family to go to university. there have been a few more who have gone to university, so the family is divided between working—class and professionals. we had this afternoon together, and my family has normally been democratic. almost everybody. not this time. we
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had about 60% of them who went for trump, and about 40% went for clinton. why? because they said ba lea k clinton. why? because they said ba leak caused the crash and the depression, and we lostjobs and had a lot of problems. —— they said the elite caused the crash. the interesting part is that lots of them said they didn't like clinton, that she feathers her own nest, that she is part of the a leak. they didn't vote for trump, but they wouldn't go for clinton. we are where we are, it's one of those phrases. we will talk more about that in an hour. great. good to see you. the headlines are coming up. hello, this is breakfast, with
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charlie stayt and steph mcgovern. coming up before nine, nick will have the weather. but first, a summary of this morning's main news. president donald trump has wasted no time in getting to work. shortly after his inauguration parade ended, the new man in charge signed an executive order to begin dismantling ba rack 0bama's affordable care act, known as 0bamaca re. and now the president and first lady of the united states will take their
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first dance. # and now the end is near... the president and first lady also attended a number of traditional balls held to celebrate the inauguration. they danced to my wayjust hours after thousands gathered to see him take the oath of office and hear his inaugural address. people that weren't so nice to me we re people that weren't so nice to me were saying that we did a really good job today. they hated to do it, but they did it, and i respect that. you're going to see things happen over the next few weeks — oh, you're going to be so happy. because there are very elegant people tonight, but there are also very political people, right? we want to see great things happen for our country. we
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wa nt things happen for our country. we want to make america great again, and we will. and we will. reacting to president trump's inaugural speech to put america "first", the foreign secretary borisjohnson told the bbc he remains positive about the prospect of a new trade deal with the us. the new president has made it clear that he wants to put britain at the front of the line for a new trade deal. 0bviously, that is extremely exciting and important. and he is keen to get it done as fast as possible and is optimistic that it can be done soon. he has said within a short period after the exit from the eu, and that is great. it has got to work for the uk as well, but there is every reason to be positive. italian firefighters say four more survivors have been pulled out of the debris of the hotel swamped by an avalanche on wednesday. four children were among those pulled from the remains yesterday. attempts are continuing to rescue two more known survivors, but at least 15 people remain unaccounted for.
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a hungarian coach has crashed in northern italy, killing at least 16 people. the coach was on its way back from a mountain resort in france when it hit a pylon at a motorway exit near the city of verona and caught fire. according to reports, the coach was carrying a large number of schoolchildren. the leaders of some of europe's right—wing populist parties will gather in the german city of koblenz today to discuss their shared opposition to the european union. the leader of the french national front, marine le pen, and the dutch politician geert wilders are among those planning to attend. thousands of protestors are expected to demonstrate outside the event. the brazilian football club, chapecoense, will play its first match tonight after nearly all of its players were killed in a plane crash in columbia. the club has made 20 new signings since the disaster, which left 71 people dead. the friendly against current champions palmeiras will raise money for the victims‘ families.
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those are the main stories this morning. mike is with us with the sport. this is going to be a tough game. uncharted territory for everybody. 20 new players will be on the pitch, three of the survivors watching on after that tragedy, which has changed the club for everybody, because they used to be an underdog. now they have the spotlight of the world on them. and it is hard to see past this. it was a moment when the football world came together in support. it touched the hearts of everybody. let's take a look at that picture. that is someone who is on fire right now. talk about momentum in sport being important. andy murray became world number one last year. johanna konta has now won eight matches on the trot, and who is to say she can't go all the way at the australian open? she got to the semifinals last year. i don't think she could fear anyone, given
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the way she dispatched caroline wozniacki earlier today. johanna konta has breezed into the fourth round of the australian open. she's just beaten former world number one caroline wozniacki in straight sets in an hour and fifteen minutes. konta's been in fantastic form this year, winning a title in sydney in the build up to the big grand slam in melbourne, and wozniacki simply had no answer to britain's number one. wozniacki, who's seeded 17, only managed to win four games, as konta cruised to an eighth straight victory. she'll now play ekaterina makarova, in the fourth round. i'm very happy with the level i was able to maintain throughout that much. from the get go, i knew she was not going to give it to me. caroline is the kind of player that will make her opponents really earn any point they win against her. i knew that, and ifelt any point they win against her. i knew that, and i felt i any point they win against her. i knew that, and ifelt i committed any point they win against her. i knew that, and i felt i committed to the way i wanted to play and had trust in that, even if it wasn't
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going to work sometimes, it was going to work sometimes, it was going to work sometimes, it was going to bring the opportunities. and i am happy that it did that today. and you can see how konta won her match on a highlights programme at 3 o'clock on bbc two this afternoon. before that on your telebox, on bbc one dan walker will be popping up with his football focus power hour...and a chance today for liverpool and spurs to step up the pressure on chelsea. you don't want to miss the football focus power hour. we have got loads on today. interesting that you talk about chapecoense, because that is the football story of the weekend for me. azpilicueta from chelsea has been one of their best players. he will be talking about them being the league. they play hull this weekend. george from boro will be on. he is a secret ukelele player. he mentions it in the interview. he talks about how ahi it in the interview. he talks about how ah i try to establish themselves asa how ah i try to establish themselves as a premier league side. so it is a real insight into them and the season they are having. we have turned pool speaking to west brom
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fan adrian chiles. there is a lovely piece on bonnyrigg. sean connery led for them in the 1950s. they may take on hibs in the scottish cup. we have james mcavoy doing premier league predictions as well and peter crouch is on the edge of a milestone in terms of the goals he has scored in the premier league and he has been speaking to pat murphy. 99 premier league goals, manchester united next opponents and your first goal for stoke was against manchester united? that's right. i would love to take that again. that would love to take that again. that would be great. when you get your hundredth premier league goal, are you going to resurrect the robot? so many people have said to me, if you get your hundredth, you have got to do it. the pressure is taking its
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toll, let's put it that way. we have got all of that today. and we have joleon lescott, jimmy floyd hasselbaink and mark schwarzer in the studio. a striker, defender and the studio. a striker, defender and the goalkeeper. where are you going to be? on the theme of where you play, please tell me that sean connery played with the number sheven on his back! is it time for me to go?! clearly, the next time we cover this subject, you two can cover this subject, you two can cover it. in the fourth round of the scottish cup, what a day for bonnyrigg rose athletic, who will be trying to take down last year's winners hibs. and if you are wondering
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who they are, they are based just south of edinburgh, and they're the current champions of the east region super league! that's one of the three o'clock kick—offs. before that, last year's beaten finalist rangers take on motherwell. elsewhere, formartine united, from the highland football league have a trip to top flight partick thistle. in rugby union, northampton, suffered a fourth european champions cup defeat of the campaign, as they were beaten 26—17 at montpellier. saints already knew they couldn't progress, but the french side can go through in a best runner—up spot if other results go their way this weekend. leinster boosted their chances of securing a home quarter—final, with a thrilling 24—24 draw, at castres. leinster came back from seven points down at half—time, to earn two points. only a massive win for connacht, away to toulouse tomorrow, would deprive them of home advantage in the last eight. jonny bairstow will replace alex hales in england's twenty20 squad to face india.
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hales will miss the remainder of the tour, after suffering a fractured hand. the opener damaged it during the second one—day international defeat on thursday. he will fly home today. england play the final game of their three—match one series tomorrow before the twenty20 series starts on thursday. barry hawkins has denied world number one mark selby the chance to hold the world, uk and masters crowns at the same time — after beating him 6—3 in their masters semi—final. neither player was at his best in a nervy match at alexandra palace. but at 4—3, hawkins won two in a row, to book his place in the last four. he'll play joe perry, who eased past ding junhui by six frames to one. that match is later today. the other semi—final is between ronnie 0'sullivan and marco fu. in what sport 100 years ago where
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the household names could take a smart and fish smart? they were cousins. they were too matter of the long track speed skaters from 100 yea rs long track speed skaters from 100 years ago. if you think of mo farah, but on ice, they were known as turkey smart and fish smart. great britain started it in the 1870s and for decades, dominated the world of longtrack speed skating — outside on the frozen fens. but as the climate changed, the sport almost died out... until now. the frozen fans in eastern england, where once the world's top speed skaters would draw huge crowds. but in the second half of the 20th century, scenes like this and the
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ice itself with him on the ground due to climate change, and by the 90s, british long track speed skating had all but gone. but three yea rs skating had all but gone. but three years ago, the british long track programme was reborn. here in the netherlands, the country that now dominates this sport. looking more like a stadium than an ice rink, the netherlands responded to the warmer winters by building 17 of these arenas with their 400 metre tracks. and for the brits who now come here, it's and for the brits who now come here, its home from home. on a rink as big as this, there enough space for the team to build their stamina and speed alongside the hundreds of leisure skaters who use every day. it's been reborn in the netherlands, mainly because we don't have a facility like this in the uk. it's an absolute tragedy. to think we are we we re an absolute tragedy. to think we are we were in the beginning of the
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development in the fens. we only have short cut figure skating rinks, which are maximum of 60 metres long in the uk. so you quickly run out of space. so first steps with the british team. these are bit more difficult than this case you go on every christmas once a yearjust for leisure, because they are just 1.2 millimetres thick. that is why i looked like bambi. get nice and low. i obviously needed a body suit, and to learn the moves the british team packedis to learn the moves the british team packed is at home when they can't get out of here. so you do this in the garage? at least a long track is a time trial, supposedly about pure speed rather than a race with the risk of others taking you down. and to help you on your way, the special boots are hinged to give you extra leverage. i feel like i am part of
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the wind. the first couple of steps, you need to be explosive and get that speed up. then you can accelerate and finish your stride. as she was keen to prove to me out of the blocks in my debut time trial against her. races can be 5000, even 10,000 metres. for me, 100 metres was like a marathon. and while elia finished in 12 seconds, she had time to put the tea on before i came in at 46.6, a personal best. there were about 50 races in all, andi there were about 50 races in all, and i appeared in the middle. the crowd had no idea that i had never skated before. but you didn't fall over. i didn't. skated before. but you didn't fall over. ididn't. but skated before. but you didn't fall over. i didn't. but it shows you the power of the investment. the netherlands were at the same level as the uk. then they built 17 of those stadiums in the 90s, at a cost
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of around 13 million euros each, and it has paid dividends. they have won 23 out of 36 medals at the last winter olympics. and did you say your ankles hurt? no, your feet, because you are getting used to it. to do 10,000 metres on those skates, you would have to build up to that because of the pain. but you are on your way. you start it out. they are hoping to get someone along to the 2022 winter olympics for great britain. don't rule it out. see you later. i would try to get you to say seven again in your sean connery style. you can never get him to do anything twice. a commuter who suffered months of disruption on southern trains has had half the cost of his season ticket refunded by his credit card company. american express reimbursed the customer nearly £2,500
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because they deemed that he didn't receive the service he paid for. so can others make similar claims? paul lewis from radio 4's money box programme joins us from london. there have not been many good news stories for commuters lately. this is potentially one of them?m certainly could be. this gentleman, we are calling him sean, not his real name is he wanted to be anonymous, but he was a commuter from london to brighton, costing £4800 a yearfor from london to brighton, costing £4800 a year for the privilege. from london to brighton, costing £4800 a yearfor the privilege. he bought his season ticket and then there was a year of complete disruption, whether it was cancelled services, like trains, overcrowding and a change in timetabling, so many trains were taken off the timetable. and he worked out from records that he got from the train company southern that more than half of his journeys were disrupted. so instead of claiming direct from the company, he went to his credit card company, american express. it went into their dispute procedure and within a very
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short time, he got a very nice payment of £2400. so, anyone who has been caught up in any of these will been caught up in any of these will be thinking, i will do that? yes, they will. underpinning this dispute procedure, there is something called section 75 of the consumer credit act. that makes a credit card providerjointly liable act. that makes a credit card provider jointly liable with act. that makes a credit card providerjointly liable with the supplier of the service if it fails. his case was that it clearly had failed and it wasn't what he bought for £4800 a year before. so you would have to make that case. this is something for southern passengers, not if your train has been a bit late on a few occasions. you could go to your credit card provider if you paid by credit card, claim under section 75 and even on a debit card, you can claim under a procedure called chargeback, with similar rules. because of a contract between the contract providers and bees and mastercard, they are obliged to pay. it is worth trying. you may not get it immediately. the
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credit card company may try to say it was not really southern's fault etc. but you can then go to the financial ombudsman service and see if you get a result from them. so for southern commuters who have suffered more than a year of disruptions, it is worth trying. on a technicality, people will be very interested in this, but sean, i know it is not his real name, but was he meticulous singer but had he literally recorded each delay? if you write in and say i have been caught upa you write in and say i have been caught up a few times and it has been a bit rubbish, it would have to have a much more detailed plan, wouldn't you ? have a much more detailed plan, wouldn't you? yes, and he did. he got the records from southern. they are obliged to publish their records of running. i'm not sure if they are on their website or if he had to apply for them, but he got their records and put his case briefly to american express, explained about the cancellations and crucially, the timetable operations, because it wasn't just trains that were delayed, some trains disappeared from the timetable. so he couldn't claim for those under the normal
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delay procedures. so he put in a reasonable case. i have seen it. he had the records behind it, but you can get those from the railway company. so it takes a bit of work, many of these things do, but in this case, half his season ticket money, £2000, is worth having. will amex in to try to get the money of southern rail? we haven't been able to find that out. they would not talk about this case. they have only said it was not section 75, it was their procedure. but that is underpinned by section 70 five. we don't know the answer to that. but certainly, if you went with a debit card through the chargeback procedure, your card company could go to southern and try and get the money back from them. that would be away for them to get some of the money back. under section 75, for them to get some of the money back. undersection 75, if for them to get some of the money back. under section 75, if it is a credit card, they are jointly liable. so really, they have to up.
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—— they have to pay up. you can hear more on money box on radio 4 at midday. nikitin with the weather. fog seems to be the word of the day? —— nick is here with the weather. this view is from wales, with temperatures well below freezing in the coldest spots and some thick fog and a hard frost in places. 0ther spots have the frost, but not the fog. so a sunnier view here. two things are going on this morning. either you have plenty of crisp sunshine to start the day, or you are getting some fog patches. either way, it is a chilly start of the day. this is the extent of that fog through parts of the midlands and parts of wales. summer that will be to clear. some of it is patchy in nature. there is a lot of sunshine around, although not in the far south—west of england. here, you
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start with more clout, but you're not as cold as elsewhere. and similar towards these north sea coasts. it is a sunnier day on the way for northern ireland wants any of your fog clears and more widely across scotland compared with recent days. no frost in the northern and western isles. plenty of crisp sunshine once that fog clears. great weather for getting out and about, although bear in mind that it is chilly. cloud increasing in south—west england into northern ireland. this area of cloud around the north sea is expanding into the north of east anglia as well. after temperatures started at several degrees below freezing, we are looking at three to six celsius for the uk generally. for the cloud running through northern england into southern and central scotland overnight, some drizzly rain in places. a few wintry flurries on the hills. a few showers in south—west england and wales. just a patchy frost tonight. it may tend to come
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and go wherever you are as the cloud moves around overnight. still some patchy fog to start sunday. here is your part two of the weekend. not as much sunshine. this will be your sunnier area, where the cloud is thick enough to capture shower. there is a chance of catching sleet or snow out of those showers on the high ground because it is cold, but nothing amounting to very much. it is essentially still a dry weekend. millions of people around the world watched donald trump being sworn in as president. breakfast‘s john maguire joined one group of american students here in the uk for an inauguration party — to see what they thought of the occasion. right across the united states and around the world, americans gathered to witness an event that so many had predicted couldn't and wouldn't happen. i, donald john trump, do solemnly swear... that i will faithfully execute...
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the office of president of the united states. these students, studying in london, are thousands of miles from home, yet witnessed every second of donald trump's inauguration as if they had a front row seat on capitol hill. in washington, the atmosphere was serious, momentous, even. so in london, we decided to lighten the mood. folks, we are going to play trump bingo, top trumps, whatever you want to call it. we are going to give you these valuable and rare bbc breakfast cue cards. i want you to each choose four words, phrases and mannerisms. as the president makes his speech, you have to mark each time it comes along, and whoever gets the most at the end will win a prize. or at least will win, how does that sound? we, along with the global audience, hung on every word and, luckily for one,
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every hand gesture. we are transferring power from washington, dc and giving it back to you. i did terribly. i only got three. three mentions of the word "strong"? 0k. igot 30. 29 ok gestures and one "beautiful". we will make america safe again and, yes, together with will make america great again. an inaugural speech should differ from campaign rhetoric and lacks the policy details of the state of the union address. so how did president trump fare? based on his crowd, i think it's something they would have liked, but for an inaugural address, i don't think he did a good job. it seemed like he was still in campaign mode, talking about the issues and why he is the one to fix them, but it seems like he already sold himself to the people and he won the election, now he should talk more about healing and more
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ambiguous overall themes about going forward. "we are going to make america great again" — he only said it once, but at the same time he spoke about healing the country, making compromises, not just for the country, but the whole world, and i thought that was paradoxical. so far, the man who has just become the 45th president has confounded history, politics, convention and, if he governs in the same vein, then, as the 40th president used to declare, you ain't seen nothing yet. interesting to hear people talk about his style and gestures, but also how he communicates. donald trump has embraced social media more than any other president. so it was at that people took to twitter to
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give their views. fellow republican and former california governor, arnold schwarzenegger, wished president trump luck and thanked barack 0bama for his service. former cbs news anchor dan rather remarked he had never seen the country so divided, anxious, fearful or uncertain, while after handing over the official twitter handle 0bama tweeted from his old, personal account: "is this thing still on?" and he said he and michelle would return to work after a short holiday. 0lly mann presents the media podcast and he joins us from our london newsroom. it is fairto it is fair to say that social media was absolutely dominated yesterday by this inauguration. how do you think it went down? well, the internet is a series of silos now,
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it is not just internet is a series of silos now, it is notjust one place where you can ask what the internet thought. as trump's victory clearly illustrates, there are older republican voters, the kind of peoplejohn mccain were trying to woo in 2008, who were not in the internet who are now not only over the internet and social media, but com pletely the internet and social media, but completely distrust the mainstream media and follow things only online. and there are other millennials who only follow things on the internet. sue you can't generalise and the statistics are not out yet, but i am prepared to say yet they will have been the biggest ever day on twitter. it was astonishing for them not only to have a president sitting in the white house who is continuing to use their service in a personal capacity, but also to live stream the event in exceptional quality. if you had a look at that, they were broadcasting in high—definition to rival broadcast networks yesterday. it isa rival broadcast networks yesterday. it is a really big change from previous inaugurations. what were
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the main things that stood out to you? there was a lot of humour on there as well as some serious points being made. what were your favourites? well, like you say, ifi am going to generalise about the internet, they do like to take these little moments, which are almost those type of gogglebox moments, the things everyone is thinking when they are at home sitting on the sofa, but perhaps the news anchors on the broadcast networks are not allowed to say. it is little moments like baron trump, trump's ten—year—old son, appearing to be rather bored during elements of the day, because he is ten and it is a long day. there was the moment michelle 0bama was given that gift by melania trump on the steps of the white house, who appeared not to know what to do with it good and that the camera. i saw that contextualised in many amusing ways. and generally also a kind of paranoia about the white house website and what the changes to the white house website might mean about
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the policies of the administration. there was a lot of analysis about that. the reset button was pressed on the white house website. energy, foreign policy, military, law—enforcement and growth and jobs we re law—enforcement and growth and jobs were the things that appeared along with the biographies and the like, and then the things that were missing, like climate change, lgbt writes, a lot of people had a lot of things to say about that. absolutely. if you are someone who is gay and feels that trump is not going to stand up for you in the same way that the 0bama administration did, like the star trek actor, george takei, who tweeted about this, the lgbt page appearing from the —— disappearing from the white house website will be concerning, particularly when gay marriage has only just concerning, particularly when gay marriage has onlyjust happened in the united states. the most amusing example, you mentioned the biographies, was on melania trump's page. she listed her various
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credits, and to be fair, her career was as a model. so you would expect it to say she has posed for various magazines. but there was a reference on the white house website last night specifically to their brand of jewellery that you can buy from qvc, with the trademark and everything. that has disappeared overnight, and now says "she also designed a range of jewellery". so it now says "she also designed a range ofjewellery". so it is interesting that even on the day of the inauguration, there are people within the administration who are sensitive to criticism online as people have said, donald trump is distancing himself from his business interests so that he can be president. and yet his wife was right there on the website of the white house, advertising her range of jewellery that you can buy and where you can buy it. there is so much analysis and i imagine lots of things will change while they try to get the website right. thank you very much. 0lli maatta is presenter of the media podcast. —— 0lly mann.
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hello. this is breakfast, with charlie stayt and steph mcgovern. the first full day in office for the new president of the united sates, as donald trump pledges to fulfill his campaign promises he's already signed his first orders as president, including changes to barack 0bama's healthcare act, which mr trump said he will repeal. we want to make america great again, and we will. inauguration day ended with a series of balls, before the president and first lady returned to the white house to spend the first night in their new home.

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